What you can do
People seated and holding rainbow flags at Pride in London 2015  © Simon Callaghan Photography

Why do we still bother with Pride?

Hello!

Welcome to Young Stonewall’s brand new blog! We’ll be using this section to keep you up to date with the work we do for, and with, young people. You’ll hear from Stonewall staff and guest authors at least once a month on all things LGBT. We opened the blog with a brilliant piece by Charlie Craggs, one of our youth programme alumni, about Trans Day of Visibility.

It’s Pride season

As Pride season is just around the corner we thought we’d take a look at why these events are still important and why we host our Youth Pride event every year at Pride in London and – for the first time this year – at Manchester Pride.

Pride is a time when LGBT communities come together and reflect on how far they’ve come as well as acknowledge how much more there is still to do. Sometimes it’s a celebration, sometimes it’s a political statement and often it’s a mixture of the two. Pride marches began in 1969 after the Stonewall riots in New York and now they take place all over the world.

Stonewall riots 1969

As the fantastic 2014 film Pride shows, (anyone else sob their way through to the end?) these events (which can be very emotional) are extremely important to lesbian, gay, bi and trans people, as well as the allies, friends and families who support them. 

Still from film 'Pride' (2014) - copywright CBS Films

In the UK today, lesbian, gay and bi people have full legal equality, same-sex couples can get married and employers have a legal duty to tackle discrimination at work. So why do over 750,000 people still gather in London each year to raise awareness of LGBT issues?

Here’s a great quote from someone who attended our Youth Pride event in London last year, which shows exactly why these community events are so important:

I felt much more confident in being myself and to be open with my sexuality, especially being around others whom identify with the LGBT+ community, and it was amazing to see so many different groups and people in support of pride watching the parade; it made me feel we are going in the right direction.

Although we’ve come so far in the UK, there is still so much more to do. Pride events help remind us all that although we can and should be proud of our sexuality and gender identity, there is still work to be done until all lesbian, gay, bi and trans people are accepted without exception.

Our Youth Pride events

This is why we think our Youth Pride events are really important. We’ve run our London event for a few years now and we’re really excited that this year, for the first time, we’ll be hosting a Youth Pride event in Manchester! It’s a chance to meet other young people and Stonewall staff, march in the parade with thousands of others, celebrate the diversity of the LGBT community and also get a free Stonewall t-shirt!  

Applications for the London Pride event are now open! It’s free to attend and places are limited, so make sure you complete your application as soon as you can. Stonewall covers travel and lunch costs and anyone can attend, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity, as long as you are aged 16 to 21 on the day of the event. Applications for the Manchester Pride event will open in June, so if you'd like to register interest for that event, please drop us an email at stonewallyouth@stonewall.org.uk! We'll send you an email when applications open and keep you in the loop.

Join Stonewall and thousands of others to celebrate LGBT equality this summer.

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