What you can do

Lesbian visibility matters

Lesbian Day of Visibility is an important opportunity to celebrate the wonderful diversity in our community, as well as a chance to break some of the prevalent stereotypes about what it means to be LGBT.

It also crucially gives a platform to strong lesbian role models, who’s stories make us all feel visible too. That's why this day matters.

One thing I’m reminded of on this day is the common misconception that as a lesbian you are either ‘butch’ or ‘femme’ and never both or anything in between.

This is not only frustrating, but can also be degrading and demeaning. These identities should obviously be celebrated, but not forced on people.

I am not one thing. I am much more than that. We all are.

When people know or presume your sexuality, they often take one look at you and decide which stereotype best fits.

But I am not here to play a role for other people. I am not one thing. I am much more than that. We all are.

When I think about the world I want to live, I think about the need for strong lesbian role models in all walks of life. Real people with complex and varied identities.

It's so important to feel that you are part of a community.

Growing up, I had no one to reflect back who I was at school, in my community or on TV. This can make you feel your identity isn’t valid. It made me hide.

Today, my life is very different - I'm able to be myself, but I still want to see more lesbian role models and be seen as one too.

Young people will continue to go through the challenges of self-discovery and will always need to see a world in which their identities are represented and role models exist.

They will need to feel valid and appreciated.

You can stand up as a role model.

It's so important to feel that you are part of a community. Feeling alone, like you are the only one, can be debilitating.

This April, I am proud to celebrate the strong lesbian women in my life. They are all different. They are not what you think they are. They are wonderful and diverse.

You can stand up as a role model to help send the message to young people discovering their own identity that they are not alone.