Stonewall's Gay and Bisexual Men's Health Survey

With 6,861 respondents from across Britain, 633 of those being from Scotland, this is the largest survey ever conducted of gay and bisexual men's health needs in the world. However, it demonstrates that many of those needs are not being met and that there are areas of significant concern - most particularly in mental health and drug use - that have been overlooked by health services which too often focus solely on gay men's sexual health.

These findings send a stark message that Scotland's health services need to rethink how they approach many of their patients.

The Report

Key Findings

  • In the last year, three per cent of gay men and seven per cent of bisexual men have attempted to take their own life. Just 0.4 per cent of men in general attempted to take their own life in the same period.

  • One in sixteen (six per cent) gay and bisexual men aged 16 to 24 have attempted to take their own life in the last year. Less than one per cent of men in general aged 16 to 24 have attempted to take their own life in the same period.

  • Almost half of gay and bisexual men worry about the way they look and wish they could think about it less.

  • One in five gay and bisexual men have had problems with their weight or eating at some time.

  • Half of gay and bisexual men have experienced at least one incident of domestic abuse from a family member or partner since the age of 16 compared to 17 per cent of men in general.

  • More than a third of gay and bisexual men have experienced at least one incident of domestic abuse in a relationship with a man.

  • One in three gay and bisexual men have never been tested for any sexually transmitted infection.

  • One in three gay and bisexual men have never had an HIV test in spite of early diagnosis now being a public health  priority.

  • A third of gay and bisexual men who have accessed healthcare services in the last year have had a negative experience related to their sexual orientation.

  • More than a third of gay and bisexual men are not out to their GP or healthcare
    professionals. Gay and bisexual men are more likely to be out to their manager, work colleagues, family and friends than their GP.

  • Only a quarter of gay and bisexual men said that healthcare workers had given them information relevant to their sexual orientation.

 


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