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Why I'll Come Out For Trans equality this National Hate Crime Awareness Week

National Hate Crime Awareness Week runs 14 - 21 October. Now in its sixth year, these seven days aim to bring people, groups and organisations together to raise awareness of hate crime and to take an active stand against it.  

For LGBT people, hate crime remains a very real issue.   

Our recent LGBT in Britain - Hate Crime and Discrimination report revealed the extent of the abuse and violence that LGBT people continue to face in 2017. One in five LGBT people have experienced a hate crime because of their sexual orientation or gender identity in the last year.

The number of lesbian, gay and bi people who have experienced a hate crime has risen by 78 per cent since 2013. 

The number of lesbian, gay and bi people who have experienced a hate crime has risen by 78 per cent since 2013. 

These figures are just the tip of a very large iceberg. 

As a gay man who has been victim to a hate crime on my own doorstep this year, I now join the 7 per cent of lesbian, gay and bi people who do not feel safe where they live. I also join the three in five gay men who do not feel comfortable holding their partner’s hand while walking down the street. This is an unacceptable but very real reality.  

But for the trans community, the situation is so much worse.

  • Two in five trans people have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their gender identity in the last year, compared to one in six lesbian, gay or bi people who are not trans.
  • Two in five who identify as non-binary have experienced a hate crime in the last year.
  • 14 per cent of trans people do not feel safe where they live. 44 per cent of trans people avoid certain streets because they do not feel safe, compared to 26 per cent of lesbian, gay or bi people who are not trans.

That’s why this National Hate Crime Awareness Week, I am giving special thought to our trans siblings and urge you to join me and Come Out For Trans equality as a visible ally. ​

That’s why this National Hate Crime Awareness Week, I am giving special thought to our trans siblings and urge you to join me and Come Out For Trans equality as a visible ally. 

Being a trans ally is about being active and there to support. When you hear hurtful or abusive language towards trans people, challenge it. Confront your own assumptions, prejudices and biases by educating and empowering yourself through research. Listen to trans people about their lives and experiences, remembering that everyone’s stories differ. 

Right now, the trans community needs everyone’s support to campaign for the new Gender Recognition Act that supports all trans and non-binary people. This would be a huge improvement to trans people’s rights. But, there will be lots of hurdles that could delay, or stop, this change.

We won’t be able to win these rights without you. So, be an ally. Come Out For Trans.

Come out for trans equality. Sign up to campaign for trans rights.

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