Police and Crime Commissioners

Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) were elected across England and Wales in November 2012. This is a new role and it is hoped that by holding Chief Constables and police forces to account, PCCs will make them more accountable to local people.

The role of PCCs

PCCs will set the budget for your local police force, set local policing priorities, hire and (if necessary) fire the Chief Constable and engage with the local community. They have to set their local policing plan by the end of March 2013 and have a responsibility to consult local people on the plan. 

PCCs will therefore make crucial decisions affecting how the local police tackle issues such as homophobic hate crime, same-sex domestic violence and anti-social behaviour in the local community. This is why it is really important PCCs engage with and understand the needs of their local lesbian, gay and bisexual community.

Issues to raise

PCCs are accountable to the local community and should set local police budgets and priorities to reflect their concerns. PCCs have until the end of March 2013 to set their local policing plan and it is important that local lesbian, gay and bisexual people, as well as organisations and community groups that work with them, engage with PCCs to raise the concerns of the local lesbian, gay and bisexual community. Some PCCs will be holding meetings in the local community, others may be running surveys. Whatever they’re doing, get involved.

It is important that PCCs understand the needs of local lesbian, gay and bisexual people. Stonewall has published a range of research, covering every police region in England and Wales, that you may find useful when engaging with your local PCC. Key findings include:

Homophobic hate crime in Wales

Since 2006 Stonewall Cymru has been collecting data on Homophobic Hate Crime from the four Welsh Police forces and the Crown Prosecution Service. The total number of reports of homophobic hate offences each calendar year has averaged 459, and there has been an increase of 13%. Of those total reports, an average of 13% were taken up by the Crown Prosecution Service as homophobic defendant prosecutions. Successful prosecutions showed a total of 75% increase between 2006 and 2011 with a 100% increase between 2006 and 2008.


Click here for Statistics of homophobic hate crime reporting to Welsh Police in  2011-06 calendar years.
Click here for Statistics of homophobic defendant  by CPS in Wales in  2011-06 calendar years.

Stonewall has published a range of research, covering every police region in England and Wales, that you may find useful when engaging with your local PCC. Key findings include:

Homophobic hate crime

- One in eight lesbian and gay people experience a homophobic hate crime or incident a year.
- Over one in ten lesbian and gay people think homophobic hate crimes are a 'big problem' in their local area.

Experiences of the police

- Over three in four victims of homophobic hate crimes or incidents did not report them to the police. Seven in ten victims did not report it to anyone.
- The primary reasons for not reporting incidents to the police are victims not feeling it was serious enough to report (43 per cent), not thinking the police would or could do anything (34 per cent), not feeling it would be taken seriously (27 per cent) and the incidents being too common to report (15 per cent).

Domestic abuse

- Half of gay and bisexual men have experienced at least one incident of domestic abuse from a family member or partner compared to 17 per cent of men in general.
- Four in five lesbian and bisexual women and gay and bisexual men have not reported incidents to the police.

Young people

- Three in five victims say the perpetrator of the homophobic hate crime was a stranger under the age of 25.
- One in four gay people under 25 have experienced a hate crime or incident in the past three years (compared to one in five gay people overall).

These findings are taken from Homophobic Hate Crime - The Gay British Crime Survey 2008, Serves You Right (2008), Gay and Bisexual Men's Health Survey (2012), Prescription for Change (2008), The Teachers' Report (2009) and The School Report (2012). All of these publications and more can be downloaded free from www.stonewall.org.uk/publications 

Who is your local PCC?

Below are the names and links to the websites of the four PCCs in Wales:


Dyfed Powys Police  – Christopher Salmon (http://www.dyfed-powys.pcc.police.uk)
Gwent Police – Ian Johnston (http://www.gwent.pcc.police.uk)
North Wales Police – Winston Roddick http://www.northwales-pcc.gov.uk
South Wales Police – Alun Michaels http://www.south-wales.pcc.police.uk
 

If you would like any further information on how to engage with your PCC or would like to give us feedback about your experience please contact us on cymru@stonewallcymru.org.uk 


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If you cannot find the information you need on this website, you can call the Stonewall Cymru offices on 029 20 237744 or 01492 622202 or the Stonewall info line on 08000 50 20 20 (Mon-Fri 9:30am - 5:30pm) and we will try to point you in the right direction.