What you can do
Person walking alone

LGBT in Britain - Hate Crime and Discrimination

Based on YouGov polling of more than 5000 LGBT people in Britain

  • One in five LGBT people have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the last 12 months 

  • Two in five trans people have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their gender identity in the last 12 months 

  • Four in five anti-LGBT hate crimes and incidents go unreported, with younger LGBT people particularly reluctant to go to the police

LGBT in Britain - Hate Crime and Discrimination is Stonewall's new research highlighting the shocking levels of hate crime and discrimination that LGBT people still face in Britain today.

Based on YouGov polling of over 5000 LGBT people, the research reveals that anti-LGBT abuse extends far beyond acts of hate and violence on our streets. Many LGBT people still endure poor treatment while using public services and going about their lives, whether in their local shop, gym, school or place of worship. 

Download the report

LGBT in Britain - Hate Crime (2017)

Scotland and Cymru

Key findings

Hate crime

  • One in five LGBT people (21 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the last 12 months
  • Two in five trans people (41 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their gender identity in the last 12 months and one in six LGB people, who aren’t trans (16 per cent), have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation in the same period
  • The number of lesbian, gay and bisexual people who have experienced a hate crime or incident in the last year because of their sexual orientation has risen by 78 per cent from nine per cent in 2013 to 16 per cent in 2017
  • Four in five LGBT people (81 per cent) who experienced a hate crime or incident didn't report it to the police
  • Three in 10 LGBT people (29 per cent) avoid certain streets because they do not feel safe there as an LGBT person
  • More than a third of LGBT people (36 per cent) say they don’t feel comfortable walking down the street while holding their partner's hand. This increases to three in five gay men (58 per cent)
  • One in 10 LGBT people (10 per cent) have experienced homophobic, biphobic or transphobic abuse online directed towards them personally in the last month. This number increases to one in four for trans people (26 per cent) directly experiencing transphobic abuse online in the last month

Discrimination in daily life

  • One in 10 LGBT people (10 per cent) who were looking for a house or flat to rent or buy in the last year were discriminated against because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity
  • One in six LGBT people (17 per cent) who visited a café, restaurant, bar or nightclub in the last 12 months have been discriminated against based on their sexual orientation and/or gender identity
  • One in four black, Asian and minority ethnic LGBT people (24 per cent) accessing social services in the last year have been discriminated against because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity
  • Almost three in 10 LGBT people (28 per cent) who visited a faith service or place of worship in the past 12 months experienced discrimination
  • One in ten LGBT people (10 per cent) who attended a live sporting event in the last year experienced discrimination because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity

What respondents said

I had one incident where girls did not want to enter the bathroom stall I had used despite a large queue, like as if I was infected. Straight people don't know how privileged they are to not have their love questioned, or to have romantic days out and not think about who is around you or how safe you are.

Rachel, 22 (London)

I was assaulted by a man whilst I was holding hands with my lesbian partner. He grabbed me from behind and thrust himself into me, then verbally attacked me.

Freya, 21 (Wales)

I had occasion to report that I had been harassed and suffered an injury. I talked, they listened, but it was their attitude and I got the impression that it was not being taken seriously.

Leo, 53 (North East) 

What you can do

Stonewall has made the following recommendations for all individuals who want to help tackle anti-LGBT hate crime and discrimination:

  • Take a visible stand against LGBT hate crime, join Stonewall’s ‘Come Out for LGBT’ campaign and show your support for LGBT equality in all forms. Encourage your friends, family and colleagues to join the campaign
  • Call out online anti-LGBT abuse whenever you see it, so long as it is safe to do so. Support those being targeted by letting them know you are an ally
  • Let local business owners know if you witness an anti-LGBT incident from staff or other customers so that they can tackle it. Make clear that they could risk losing you and others as customers if they don’t
  • Report incidents of homophobic, biphobic or transphobic discrimination you experience when accessing public services like housing or social services to the service provider or local council so they can take action. Contact Stonewall’s Information Service on 08000 50 20 20 for advice and support