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Come Out For LGBT: Why I'm coming out for the Australian postal survey on same-sex marriage

The Australian Marriage Law Survey is well underway, with registered Australian voters being asked one simple question: ‘Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry?’

As an Australian citizen in the UK, for equal legal rights and based on the principle of equality, I will be voting ‘Yes’.

This is just one way I want to Come Out For LGBT.

Currently, under Australian law, section 5 of the Marriage Act (Cth) 1961 defines marriage as ‘the union of a man and a woman to the exclusion of all others’. This definition not only denies same-sex couples the right to marry, but also denies trans people who are already married and transition the right to amend their birth certificate whilst remaining married.

Stonewall’s mission is to let all lesbian, gay, bi and trans people, here and abroad, know they’re not alone. And for that reason, I choose to Come Out For LGBT for the LGBT communities in Australia during this crucial debating time for marriage equality down under!

As an Australian man who is already married to his same-sex partner, no day has been more incredible than the day my husband and myself stood before loved ones, exchanged rings and spoke our vows.

While my husband’s country of origin accepts and recognises our marriage, unfortunately, my country of origin currently does not.

While my husband’s country of origin, France, accepts and recognises our marriage, unfortunately, my country of origin currently does not. So I feel very privileged to have had the chance to marry.

My lesbian younger sister and partner, who are both Australian, simply don’t have the same rights afforded to me under French law by falling head over baguettes for a Frenchman. Nor does my gay uncle (or "guncle") have those very same rights if he chooses one day to marry his long-term partner.

I am hopeful that come the 15 November, the result from this postal survey will be a majority ‘Yes’. And that the Australian government and parliament will then act upon this non-legally binding survey, and respect the voices of Australia enough to legislate long overdue changes to the current Marriage Act.

I would love to be able to attend my sister’s wedding and my "guncle’s" wedding one day in the country that I grew up in, and still in my heart call home (no pressure guys!). I would also love for my French marriage with my husband to be recognised under Australian law.

To Come Out for LGBT does not necssarily mean you have to do something complicated. For me, it can simply mean being open enough to see how your decisions can impact on other people’s lives. 

To Come Out for LGBT does not necessarily mean you have to do something complicated. For me, it can simply mean being open enough to see how your decisions can impact on other people’s lives. 

If you’re an overseas registered Australian voter like me living in the UK, you should have received the same letter I received from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, informing you that from 25 September you will be able to vote online or by phone in this survey.

I urge you to Come Out for LGBT and vote ‘Yes’ for marriage equality.

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